Three Reflections for Flute and Strings


August 14, 2016

You can find the music on this page of the IMSLP, where you can also listen to computer-generated audio files.

You can find some notes about the piece here.

Transcription: Dvořák Sonatina Opus 100 for String Orchestra


April 24, 2016

This is a transcription of the complete Sonatina by Antonin Dvořák for string orchestra (an update of a 2013 transcription that had only the first movement). You can get the music on this page of the IMSLP.

Birthday Piece No. 8

[April 10, 2016]

This one contains a 2-part canon, and because I am almost 57 and can do what I want (I'll be 57 on April 30), it has 43 measures rather than the 57 that would be expected in the sequence of birthday pieces. You can find the music on this page of the IMSLP.

Transcription: Heinrich Isaac's Ach Herzogs K for String Orchestra



(The title has different spellings, but you can find it under the name of Ach Herzogs K on this page of the IMSLP.)

Transcription: Ethelbert Nevin's "Narcissus" for String Orchestra



You can hear a computer-generated recording here, and you can get the music on this page of the IMSLP.

New Year's Greeting for Solo Recorder


[December 31, 2015]

A PDF file of this can be found on this page of the IMSLP.

Here's a nice recording of the piece played on violin! [Yes. It can be played on just about any instrument.]

Variations on an Original Theme


[July 26, 2015]

The score, parts, and a computer-generated recording are available on this page of the IMSLP.

A Lost Lady


[July 7, 2015]

This is a musical response to A Lost Lady, a 1923 novel written by Willa Cather. The music and a recording are both available on this page of the IMSLP.

Transcription: Pachelbel Canon in D for String Quartet



I made this arrangement back in 2005 and only realized recently that I haven't included it in this catalog. It is very similar to my version for string orchestra (the two violin, viola, and cello parts are actually identical).

You can hear an excellent performance of it here,



and you can get the music on this page of the IMSLP.

Transcriptions: Music for Soprano and String Quartet

I made these transcriptions of ever-popular music for fun and pleasure, and will be adding to the folder (the contents of which I dare not name on these internets) from time to time.

There are also some parts for clarinet to substitute for the vocal line for some of the songs. Any C instrument can, of course, play the vocal line of the above transcriptions.

12 Preludes for 5775


[May 3 2015]

This set of preludes for the Jewish year of 5775 (our current) has a piece for every month. I wrote it in memory of my brother Marshall Fine who died during Elul of 5774. The music is available on this page of the IMSLP, as is a set of computer-generated audio files.

Birthday Piece No. 7


[April 28, 2015]

This 56-measure piece marks my 56th birthday. It is part of a series I began when I turned 50. You can find the music on this page of the IMSLP.

Transcription: Fiocco "Concerto in G" from 9-12 of his Pieces de Clavecin


[July 16, 2014]

I made this transcription (which is actually an arrangement) from the pieces that surround the famous Fiocco "Allegro" in his Opus 1 set of harpsichord pieces. The first movement is a concerto movement for violin, and the last movement has extended solo parts for a solo violin and a solo cello. I made it accessible for a "Summer Strings" style orchestra, with a "violin 2b" part for beginning violinists.

You can get the music here.

Insomnia



July 1, 2014
You can get the score and parts and listen to a computer-generated recording here.

La Cucharamama


May 27, 2014
The music and a computer-generated recording are available here.
The name of this waltz comes from Cucharamama, a fabulous restaurant in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Transcription: Come, Ye Thankful People, Come

Most people know this traditional Thanksgiving Hymn as "Come, Ye Thankful People, Come," but the piece was originally called "St. George's, Windsor," and was written by Sir George Job Elvey (1816-1893) who was the organist there. It works very well as a duet for violin and viola.


You can click on the images for a larger view, and a PDF will soon be available on this page of the IMSLP.

Here's a special bonus for your Thanksgiving enjoyment that can be played on any combination of instruments: "We Gather Together to ask the Lord's Blessing."


You can get a PDF here.

Birthday Piece No. 6 for Viola d'amore and Piano


You can get the music and hear a computer-generated recording on this page of the IMSLP Petrucci Library. A naturally-generated recording will be forthcoming.

Previous Birthday Pieces for viola d'amore and piano:
No. 1,
No. 2,
No. 3,
No. 4,
No. 5

Transcription: Amanda Maier Pieces for Viola and Piano



Two of Amanda Maier's Six Pieces for Violin and Piano work beautifully when played down an octave on the viola, so I made this transcription to share the incredible wealth found in this music. You can find a score and a computer-generated recording on this page of the IMSLP Petrucci Library. You can also listen here.

Amanda Maier (1853-1894) was born into a Swedish working-class family, and in 1869 became the first woman to receive a music degree from the Stockholm Conservatory of Music. From 1873 to 1876 she studied at the Leipzig Conservatory with Engelbert Röntgen, the concertmaster of the Gewandhaus Orchestra. She married his piano-playing son Julius. Maier, her father-in-law, and her son all played the Lipinski Stradivarius, the instrument that was stolen in January 2014 from Frank Almond, and subsequently returned.

Maier and her husband entertained Johannes Brahms and Edward Grieg in their home. Both Brahms and Grieg (who were frequent guests in Maier’s home) admired her ability as a composer, but the ethos of the time prevailed, and when Amanda became a mother, her main musical outlet became teaching her sons. She taught them well: Julius Röntgen Jr. became the second violinist in the Kneisel Quartet, and Engelbert Röntgen Jr. became the principal cellist of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra.

Maier’s Sechs Stücke were published in 1879 by the Leipzig publisher Breitkopf & Hartel, one year after Swedish publication of her Violin Sonata.

Four Souvenirs for Five Guitars


December 10, 2012

The music is available in the IMSLP Petrucci Library, and you can download the score and parts here.

Transcription: "Baseball" and "Hopscotch" from Six Summer Games



You can listen to this here, and download the score and parts here.



You can listen to this here, and download the score and parts here.

These are transcriptions for string orchestra with harp (or keyboard) of two pieces from the set of violin duets I wrote in 2011 called "Six Summer Games." "Hopscotch" is itself an adaptation of a Schottische by Franz Schubert. The play on words is obviously intentional.

Duo for Violin and Viola


January 15, 2014

This is a transcription of my 2007 Duo for Oboe and Bassoon. You can find the music here or on this page of the IMSLP.

A New Year's Resolution (Piano Prelude Number Seven)


January 1, 2014

You can download a PDF and listen to a recording by David Wolfson on this page of the IMSLP.

The Ash Grove for Strings and Harp


December 19, 2013

You can get the score and parts here, and listen to a computer-generated recording here.

Lorca's Guitar



I was inspired to write this after seeing an exhibit at the New York Public Library that included Federico Garcia Lorca's very own guitar. Photography was not permitted, so I "took" my own musical images. You can listen to a recording and download the music on this page of the IMSLP.

Sonata for Tuba and Piano



You can download the score and parts from this page of the IMSLP.

Quintet for Flute, Oboe, and String Trio


October 22, 2013

You can get the score and parts and listen to a computer-generated recording on this page of the IMSLP Petrucci Library. You can also just listen here.

Three Character Pieces (and one Transcription) for Clarinet and Viola


September 26, 2013

The score, parts, and a computer-generated recording are available here. You can read more about the piece here. You can also listen here.